Mozilla Club Leadership Training


Made by Amira Dhalla.

Learners will have the opportunity to practice and learn web literacy skills, and be introduced to information on how to teach others how to read, write, and participate on the Web.

8 hours

  • Welcome!

    Welcome to the Mozilla Club Leadership Training for women! On this fun-filled day Club Captains will gain the skills and training they need to teach how to read, write and participate on the web in an inclusive and engaging way within their Mozilla Clubs. Attendees will leave with an understanding of Web Literacy, ideas to address local issues facing women and a variety of tools to help them run their programs. Supported by UN Women and Mozilla Foundation.

  • Agenda

    • 8:30-9:00 - Arrival
    • 9:00-9:15 - Welcome and Introduction
    • 9:15-9:30 - Mozilla and Mozilla Clubs
    • 9:30-9:50 - Spectogram
    • 9:50-10:30 - Web Literacy
    • 10:30-11:30 - Activity #1, read the web
    • 11:30-12:30 - Activity #2, teach the web
    • 12:30-1:00 - Lunch
    • 1:00-2:00 - Activity #3, participate on the web
    • 2:00-2:30 - Understanding local issues
    • 2:30-3:00 - Teaching women and girls
    • 3:00-4:00 - Mozilla Club tools
    • 4:00-4:30 - Open Discussion
    • 4:30-5:00 - Hacking local issues with X-Ray Goggles
    • 5:00-5:15 - Closing Circle

      Facilitation Guide

      Run this event! Below you will find details for each agenda item above that will help you run the whole training or repeat an individual activity. Here are the slides used to accompany the training.


      Before the event. Here's our checklist of what we did ahead of time to make sure we were ready:

    • Create a sign-in sheet and place it at the door with pens.
    • Prepare nametags and leave it at the door with markers.
    • (If providing comupters) Check computers and install X-Ray Goggles on bookmark bar
    • Set up the room in the preferred faciitation style. Leave pens, paper, post-it notes, and stickers on each table.
    • Write the agenda, ground rules and wifi on large pieces of paper and put in visible places in the room.
    • Create posters for the different activities that require listing or post-in note activities.
    • Make sure there are enough power outlets, tape and anything else we need during the day.
    • Welcome and Introductions. In the introduction focus on creating an open and safe space for participants to engage and collaborate with each other. Here’s our checklist:

    • Welcome everyone and introduce all the facilitators
    • Review the agenda and share the goals of the training
    • Remind participants that if they are uncomfortable being in pictures, talking about specific issues or being quoted to let a facilitator know
    • Have participants introduce themselves by sharing their name and what they are looking forward to doing during the day
    • Review logistical information including specific information about the facilities that would be helpful to know (ex. Where is the bathroom, wifi password, hashtag for the day etc.)
    • Present ground rules for the day and ask if participants have anything else to add. You can learn more about ground rules here.
    • Break the ice with a short activity like the similarity connector (in this activity we ask individuals in the room to pair up and in their pairs find three things they have in common. Once every pair has completed the task, ask each pair to find another pair and in there new groups of four to again find three commonalities. When all groups have completed the task we will ask the group to find another group and form a new group of eight and find three new commonalities. At the end have each group share out their commonalities.)
    • History of Mozilla and Mozilla Clubs. Give a brief overview of Mozilla and dive deep into the evolution of Mozilla Clubs – how did it start, why does it exist and what is the impact Mozilla hopes to achieve. Review different case studies of current Mozilla Clubs and the resources that Mozilla Learning provides to help individuals #teachtheweb.

    • Discuss the Mozilla mission and the power of a global community
    • Share the evolution of Mozilla Clubs and it’s current goals
    • Describe what Mozilla Clubs looks like today. Share the Mozilla Club Rio Case Study. Ask if anyone wants to talk about what they've been doing in their club.
    • Share the fundamentals of a Mozilla Club.
    • Discuss tools, curriculum, and resources available at teach.mozilla.org offered by Mozilla Learning
    • Spectogram. The Spectogram is a fun game where the facilitator makes a statement and individual’s rank, with their feet, how much they agree or disagree with that statement. They are then prompted to share why they chose their answer. Here are some examples of statements we will be using in this training:

    • The internet is a place to learn
    • It’s okay to share my pictures, information and contact details on social media sites
    • I feel safe expressing my opinions online
    • Men and women are equal participants online
    • I have female role models to look up to
    • I am able to solve the issues in my city using the internet
    • I feel confident teaching others how to use the web
    • The internet can help me acheive my full potential
    • Taking screenshots of other people's picture or your conversations is an invasion privacy
    • Web Literacy and how to teach like Mozilla. Share the Web Literacy Map and what it means to read, write and particiapte on the web. As well as how to design learning spaces that provide for optimal learning and include engaging, participatory and collaborative practices.

    • Review the Web Literacy Map and it’s various skills
    • Sticky note exercises:
      • Part 1) Ask attendees to think about the best event they went and what made the event memorable in their opinion. Ideas will be written on post-it notes and displayed on the wall to be discussed as a group.
      • Part 2) Ask attendees to complete this sentence, “I learn best when…..” and add their post-it notes to the wall and discuss answers.
      • Part 3) Ask attendees to complete this sentence, “I find it hard to learn when…….” and add their post-it notes to the wall and discuss answers.
      • Ask attendees to look at the answers of everyone. Ask if anyone wants to share their ideas. They will then identify what trends they see.
      • Ask what does traditional learning look like or make us feel? How did our answers differ (or were similar) to the previous questions? Do we learn our best in traditional learning techniques or do we find it hard to learn with traditional learning techniques?
    • Follow-up the exercise by creating groups and have each group discuss one of the topics below. Then do a group shareout.
      • What does it mean to be engaging at an event?
      • What does it mean to be participatory at an event?
      • What does it mean to be collaborative at an event?
      • What does it mean to learn through making at an event?
      • How do we design the perfect learning setting? How do we physically set up our learning spaces?

      Activity #1: Read the Web. Complete the first activity in the Combating Cyberviolence against women and girls module and discuss how to create safe spaces online.

    • View the activity
    • Activity #2: Teach the Web. Complete the second activity in the Combating Cyberviolence against women and girls module and use Thimble to create new safety policies for social media sites.

    • View the activity
    • Activity #3: Participate on the Web. Complete the third activity in the Combating Cyberviolence against women and girls module and learn how to be better bystanders to online violence.

    • View the activity
    • Local issues. Discuss issues women face locally and develop club events that can be used to address those issues.

    • Brainstorm a list of issues facing women and girls locally.
    • Once we have exhausted the list, participants will be able to vote on what they believe to be the two most important issues. We will identify the top three issues as voted by the group.
    • Break into three groups and allocate one issue to each group. Participants are given 15 minutes to brainstorm an activity to address that particular issue could be in an event setting. Think of an activity using the web to discuss these issues? Think of an offline activity to discuss this issue?
    • Each group will present back their ideas and give feedback on potential activities.
    • Teaching women and girls. Discuss how to teach women and girls and create safe spaces for them to learn.

    • Start with a list of statements in which the room will vote, with their hands, whether the statement is true or false. Here are sample statements:
      • Teaching the web can only be done online
      • Women learn differently than men
      • We all have personal biases
      • If people get angry about a topic we should stop talking about it
    • Define what a safe space looks like
    • Divide the room into two groups. One group outline ways women can support each other online. The other group will discuss how women can support each other offline. Groups will share-out.
    • Mozilla Club tools. Review and answer questions about various tools and programs available to Club Captains and Mozilla Club attendees.

    • Share objectives and expectations for each club tool
    • Open Discussion. This time is an opportunity to cover any issues, questions or questions that arose in earlier parts of the training. It can also be used for participants to identify what they would like to discuss.

    • Either choose topics to discuss that were identified earlier or ask the group if there are areas in which they want to further cover
    • Ask attendees if they have any questions
    • Hacking local media with X-Ray Goggles. Learn how to hack a local newspaper online using HTML to bring awareness to local issues.

    • Visit X-Ray Goggles and enable the add-on. Play with the demo to learn how to use the tool.
    • Choose one of the local issues previously identified and write a paragraph on the issue, why it is important and what effects it has on the local community
    • Using X-Ray Goggles and the Hack My Media teaching kit, follow the instructions to remix a local newspaper with your new paragraph and a picture
    • Closing. Close out the day with some appreciations and next steps.

    • Have each participant to share something they learned and someone they appreciated today
    • Share next steps and how participants can obtain links and information shared throughout the day